Behavioral Science that empowers Product Innovation

Today I would like to introduce the conversation that I had the great privilege to conduct with Dr. Helena Rubinstein – Head of Behavioral Science at Innovia Technology.

This interview provides a great set of insights around Behavioral Science and its application to consumer behavior & decision making.

Also, Dr. Helena Rubinstein shares her experience on how product innovation research can be amplified by the academic knowledge and what research methods & approaches can be extremely helpful for the in-depth understanding of consumer behavior.

How to step-change survey engagement

One more video interview in the blog! Today I would like to share the conversation I had the privilege to conduct with Betty Adamou – CEO and Founder of Research Through Gaming.

Betty is a recognized expert in the development and design of Gamified Surveys and ResearchGames.

This interview sheds light on the key advantages of Gamified Surveys and ResearchGames, their impact on the respondents engagement & the quality of responses for open ended questions.

Video Research: Key Workshop Highlights

Co-chairing the conference “Market Research in the Mobile World: Europe 2016” in London I had a chance to participate in a workshop called: “Lights, Camera, Action- Take 2 for video research situations” led by Lightspeed.

Here I would like to share my key highlights from this workshop as well as discussions around video research which we had during the Conference.

Video research is taking a central position in consumer research. Nowadays video research can have different forms:

forms-of-video-research

The beauty of video research is that it can incorporate both qualitative and quantitative components. Thus, video script with text analytics can be leveraged for quantitative purposes.

That means that video research can be combined with or used instead of open ended questions. Research conducted by Lightspeed shows that  answers on open ended questions include on average 8 words while video responses have on average 40 – 100 words and provide much deeper insights.

Videos can also help to create shorter surveys as per Lightspeed research one video can replace 3 open ended questions. However, longer timing for the results analysis should be taken into consideration here.

Another point of consideration in video research is linked with willingness of respondents to share their videos.

During the workshop Lightspeed shared the following respondents’ concerns related with video sharing:

concerns-about-video-sharing

We as research professionals should also always keep in mind the quality of content that we’ll receive in video research. Thus, for instance, even if consumers share a video quite often they show only house but not themselves.

So, the key hits & tips before doing a video research:

  • Ask the right questions in the video interviews: describe, show…
  • Determine the length of the video in advance.
  • Specify what should be in the video/ what you want to know.
  • Make questions individualized.

It’s also important to talk to the right people during the video research. Hence, one more watch out is a skew in people who are open to the video research. For example, Lightspeed highlights that introverts and “early mainstream” aren’t very open to participate in video studies.

“Market Research in the Mobile World” Conference Highlights: Conducting Mobile Surveys

In this last issue of my highlights from the conference “Market Research in the Mobile World: Europe 2016” I would like to share key ideas and insights about surveys on a smartphone.

First fast that we should take into our consideration is that a response rate to on-line surveys is just 15-20% (Breaking Blue research).

Second fact is that up to 30% of on line surveys nowadays are answered from a smartphone device (based on FocusVision research).

So, today it’s crucial for our survey to be:

mobile-surveys

Hence, before launching any on-line survey we should always answer the following question: “How much engaging is my survey?”.

One of the possible solutions to increase respondents engagement can be a gamified survey. But please keep in mind a set of important points before rushing into a gamified survey:

watch-outs-of-gamified-surveys

In terms of the entertainment narrative gamified survey can vary from guessable games&quizzes and  movie techniques to a slide survey.

The key strengths of gamified surveys are:

  • Possibility to build a longer survey.
  • A chance to achieve better completion rate especially with very narrow targets.
  • Opportunity to benefit from functionality of mobile phones.
  • Feasibility to be relevant and keep engagement.

However, gamified surveys should be avoided in case of research of B2B and developing markets.

“Market Research in the Mobile World” Conference Highlights: Key Trends in Market Research

Today I would like to share the key highlights on the trends in market research that were discussed in the frames of “Market Research in the Mobile World: Europe 2016” conference in London.

1.Mobile crowdsourcing research is booming: there are more and more business cases where mobile crowdsourcing platforms are used.

The beauty of mobile crowdsourcing research is linked with its high agility – the solution can be used at home (pre-shopping, ethnographies, product reviews), in store (price checks, retail audits, in-store photos, OOS, competitor analysis, mystery shopping) and out of store (typical applications used, ads awareness).

2. Mobile research allows to be closer to the moments of truth: mobile operators can help to build a consumer journey and daily diaries, including commuting patterns, digitality, affluence and lifestage.

Importantly also to keep in mind that consumers use mobile a lot while on traffic.

3. Consumer first approach should be also implemented in surveys: we should ask ourselves “what do our consumers want us to ask them?”.

4. Social Media possessing a lot of information about consumers is still quite close to a holistic analysis. Thus, Antedote study underlines that only 1-20% of posts are geotargeted and 70% of the content refers to dark media (closed content).

5. Internet of Things shows a strong potential for the market research. But there should be considered a fact that device and respondents in general use different types of logic.

6. Modern technologies can allow us to get more in-depth behavioral data that can help to address a high gap between real and claimed data.

Market researchers should continue to look for the ways on how to address the difference between real and claimed data. As, for instance, research shared by Beatgrid Media has shown that real TV exposure is 19% while claimed is 34%.

Another research conducted by Wakoopa has revealed that on average 64% of the respondent’s answers about their mobile behavior is wrong and 65% of the respondents who answered wrong overestimate their usage.

7. Share of experience is more predictive than share of voice. Share of experience can include: “me using/eating/drinking”, “peer observation” and “retailer advertising”.

It’s important to remember that according to research of Mesh Agency “positive experiences have three times the impact of a neutral experience on brand consideration”.

nadia-morozova_mrmw

Transform your Consumer Empathy with the Use of Mobile

Today I would like to share with you highlights of my presentation which I did in the frames of the last conference “Market Research in the Mobile World: Europe 2016” in London.

I came to the idea to share my experience on the topic of building consumer empathy within the organization as I believe that currently mobile research technologies provide a lot of opportunities for companies. Even for those who don’t have a direct access to mobile data!

During my presentation I’ve shared a case where in close collaboration with one of the European mobile crowdsourcing companies I managed to create a solution with which employees of a company collected different types of pictures about their products & categories and answered a set of fast&easy questions on their mobile phones.

As a result it brought not only several successful business projects but also substantially increased an overall company’s engagement in listening to its consumers.

Even despite a high resistance that I’ve heard initially in the company towards getting more engaged in understanding consumers as we see below:

nadia_morozova_consumer_empathy_sl3

I received an overall felling that consumer empathy is already here:

nadia_morozova_consumer_empathy_sl5

Building on what was already available in the company, I defined what I would like to achieve at the end:

  • Consumer Empathy is a set of mind
  • For the whole Multifunctional and Leadership Team
  • That is institutionalized within the organization
  • And represents the best research ROI.

So, my solution to this case was:

nadia_morozova_consumer_empathy_sl6

However, there are several challenges which I had to overcome to achieve my initial objectives:

nadia_morozova_consumer_empathy_sl7

While overcoming these challenges I built my list of hits & tips that allowed me to achieve development of the projects with strong business results and significantly improve overall company’s involvement in listening and understanding its consumers.

nadia_morozova_consumer_empathy_sl13

Top 6 Insights on Digital

Digital continues to bring to marketers more questions than answers. Here I would like to share a set of holistic insights on Digital that comes from an academic research.

1. Higher effectiveness of consumer generated vs company created content.

“Online community participation enhances loyalty and influences new product adaptation. Communication originating in online communities has more pronounced long-term effects than firm-initiated communication” (Yadav and Pavlou, 2014).

“Customer-initiated communication is significantly more effective than firm-initiated communication for acquiring and retaining customers” (Yadav and Pavlou, 2014).

2. Personalization of the digital content is a core.

“Personalization of e-mail significantly increases perceived interactivity and clicks rates up to 62%” (Yadav and Pavlou, 2014).

3. Lower consumers price sensitivity in eCommerce vs offline stores.

“Buyers at online stores are less price sensitive than those at offline stores” (Yadav and Pavlou, 2014).

4. Building loyalty in Digital is more fruitful than in offline.

“… [there is a] strong evidence of higher brand loyalty for online purchases compared to online” (Danaher, Wilson and Davis, 2003).

“Loyalty-based price promotions are more effective in online versus offline contexts” (Yadav and Pavlou, 2014).

5. Price promotions in Digital don’t lead to strong consumers loyalty.

“Customers acquired with online price promotions make shorter-term commitments, whereas those acquired with informational e-mails or search engine ads lead to longer-term commitments (Yadav and Pavlou, 2014).

6. Social Listening can provide critical consumer insights to companies.

“Reviews, particularly their dispersion across heterogeneous customer groups, are predictive of new product success or failure” (Yadav and Pavlou, 2014).

“Negative word-of-mouth behaviors are motivated primarily by a desire to address a perceived injustice” (Yadav and Pavlou, 2014).

Overall, marketers can benefit from these insights by focusing on: 1) Digital activities that will trigger consumers to generate content; 2) creative ways to build personalized consumer content; 3) creation of strong price mix between on-line and offline trade channels; 4) enhanced loyalty programs specifically created for Digital channel; 5) Social Listening programs for new product launches and product/brand ‘always on’ monitoring.

digital_insights

Source: https:// aimia. worldsecuresystems. com/ BookingRetrieve.aspx?ID=315717

Sources: 1. Danaher, P.J., Wilson, I.W., Davis, R.A. (2003). A Comparison of Online and Offline Consumer Brand Loyalty. Marketing Science, 22 (4), pp. 461-476; 2. Yadav, M.S., Pavlou, P.A. (2014). Marketing in Computer-Mediated Environments: Research Synthesis and New Directions. Journal of Marketing, 78, pp. 20-40.